A Symi Holiday: Day 9

In brief: I had an odd dream experience, learned what a “trig point” is, discovered about geocaching by completing a treasure hunt, booked an island excursion and introduce “Cat(s) Of The Day”.

Firstly, I just want to mention this weird dream thing that happened. I’m a fairly rational person who normally sees both side of the coin with things like this. But I can’t fathom this one out. Basically I had a dream where I was Directing an entertainment show. The magazine-type show explored new talent and gave opportunities for exposure on TV. I was Directing a sequence whereby a music video was previewed for an unsigned band. With the track still playing we mixed back to the studio for the presenter to pick up and talk about it. A spotlight lit up a group of three lads in the audience and the Presenter interviewed them. Before long the interview was over and he wished them all the best for the future and the rest of the audience applauded. When I woke up, I had the song going round and round in my head. The more awake I became, the less of the lyrics I could remember. I remembered the drum sequence and the melody, but could only remember “in our wildest moments, we could be the worst of all” for lyrics.

So, of course, out of curiosity I googled it. And it’s real! It exists! I was in absolute shock! It isn’t sung by a band of three lads. It’s sung by Jessie Ware. Now, I swear I’ve NEVER heard this song in my life. Ever!! Nor heard of Jessie Ware! It’s not in my music collection or on my phone, nor have I been listening to any radio stations in the last week since being on an island in the middle of Greece. I don’t recall hearing music on the airplane on the way here or in any of the airports. Now normally the answer is that the song has been playing in the background somewhere without me realising and my brain just brought it back in a memory somehow. But I truly don’t know where it came from. I swear on my life I’ve never heard this song before.

And so, in true spirit of how I do things, here is the soundtrack to my dream!:

Moving on…

After posting yesterdays blog, I wrote in the update section near the bottom that whilst researching the history of Symi’s windmill ruins I discovered someone had hidden something up there. The official term, rather than “hide”, is geocaching. It’s effectively a worldwide game where watertight sealed containers hold trinkets and a logbook and are hidden or buried pretty much anywhere. At time of writing there are over 2 million registered locations worldwide. Several websites host databases with GPS coordinates of said locations and keep running updates of how many people have registered a “find” along with their comments and photos. It’s actually quite an interesting idea. In the summer I had helped a colleague of mine whilst Directing on Channel 5’s Big Brother to locate a geocache in Elstree. He’d been given clues to work out the coordinates, and I helped him figure it out. I never thought anything more about it at the time.

So off I went with my camera. And a key ring… more on that later…

Rushes Key Ring

Hiking back up the rocky path to the windmills, I once again made my way through the painted black gate. I came to the conclusion that you must allowed in here, despite my fear yesterday that it may have been a historical location and maybe I’d just missed the important “KEEP OUT” sign. On I trundled, much farther than I did yesterday. I only got as far as the last windmill on Monday as the rest of it just looked like rocky terrain. But past the windmills is a large stone circle. Again, I don’t know what it is as there are no information plaques or historical references to it. I spotted it on Google maps. Even further along there’s an old gun turret…

Symi Stone Circle and Windmills

What I hadn’t been aware of before were the hiking routes. Occasionally a large rock is literally dotted with a spot of red or blue paint, indicating the route you are on. The instructions to the geocache said to follow the red route, walk past the left of the stone circle and head towards the gun turret, and that the cache was between the trig point and the peak.

I don’t know if it’s a tradition or just a helpful way for other hikers to stick to the routes in low light conditions, but occasionally the dotted route boulders had piles of smaller stones on top, like little burial mounds. I took it upon myself to add a stone to a few of these as I trekked past, as a gesture of my thanks to those original route makers…

Symi hiking route markings

For a while I misinterpreted the term “trig point” from the geocache instructions, not knowing what it meant. I thought it might have meant a rock formation. I was reluctant to turn on my phone to find out as each day when it connected to the internet I was charged £1.99, and every text message received cost me 50p. In the end I gave in, logging on to find out what “trig point” meant. As expected, several messages also came through. Todays wasted money went to the scammers who text me suggesting I “could be owed £6’000 from a legal case against my bank” to recover Payment Protection on a loan I had taken out. Quite unlikely. Another wasted 50p went to the other scammers who tirelessly keep informing me that “the number plate you requested is now available. Call this number!”. At least any money lost went to my phone provider and not the scammers.

Today’s lesson: A “Trig Point” is a Triangulation Station, or a concrete pillar of sorts that is used for surveying land. I must have crossed nearly every inch of that hillside in my eye-line between the first rocky peak and the stone circle to find this so-called trig point. Time flew by as I pounced cat-like from rock formation to rock formation, playing hopscotch to avoid stepping on lizards. It must have been a comical sight for anyone peering up the hillside with binoculars as I scratched my confused head, gesturing between the peak and the stone circle with an outstretched arm. Like a mad man in an argument with himself.

Without giving the location away (should you find yourself on Symi and fancy the challenge) I’m not going to tell you exactly where the cache is hidden. All you get is this sneak peek of the box and it’s content:

Symi Pontikokastro geocache

I’m ashamed to say I broke Rule Two of the “only two rules” of geocaching by not writing my find in the log book. Purely because the pen in the apartment decided it never wanted to write again and there wasn’t an Argos-style mini pen inside the container, which I thought there would be. Therefore another lesson learned today. However I completed the other 50% of the experience by taking an item and leaving something in return; OUT came a little yellow Transformer-style toy digger, IN went… the key ring. Other items inside were a yellow balloon, a red rubber eraser toy for the end of a pencil and a blue car. I didn’t know if it was a no-no, but I didn’t want to stash away the box again without my name being in there. So I also left a business card. Maybe it would move around the world, like the little yellow digger will as it travels back to the UK with me…

Symi Pontikokastro cache trinket

I registered with one of the geocache websites when I got back to the apartment and logged my find. I also discovered there were another two caches on the island, which set me challenges for later in the week! With me being a bit of a geek I also found out that someone cleverly came up with the idea of these ever interchanging trinkets, or bugs, being trackable. You can buy two identical bugs (see what they did there?) which both have a unique code on them. You then register the code online for others to log and leave one of the bugs in a cache. I guess the other twin bug is for proving you are the owner of the trackable bug.

Later on in the evening, as suggested by Adriana with the Symi Visitor group, I went down to the harbour and spoke with one of the people who organised boat excursions. There were half a dozen available, but the one I fancied had a big chalkboard by their boat advertising an all-day trip around the island, including a barbecue. I mentioned snorkelling and the guy had a word with the captain. They said they’d bring gear along for me, at no extra cost.  It was the snorkelling gesture that sold it, which was utter genius as I had calculated a grand total of 90 euros from a local shop to buy likely-only-going-to-be-used-once gear for myself. So I booked with them. A good hard sell on their part!

Lastly, and you’ll have seen them by now, I present to you the newest feature of my blog which I have christened Cat(s) Of The Day. The bracketed letter ‘s’ is important here. I pondered on the idea of an entire Symi cat gallery and the singular title was to be used. But several of my images contain a group of cats, occasionally with kittens in tow. I also realised that of all the cat photos I seem to take each day, I would unlikely be able to choose just one. Sometimes they are just so cute they need to be shared. Sometimes they’re so cute I want to cry. Here are some of todays cats/kittens. Clicking on the images will take you to my Flickr page where you just might find some more…

Cat Of The Day 161012 1

Cat Of The Day 161012 2

Cat Of The Day 161012 3

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About Mercian Media

My name is Alex, and I work in the Film and TV industry. I work freelance for various employers on several shows including Big Brother, Celebrity Big Brother, Sky News, Sky Sports, London Live, Bloomberg and QVC. All views are my own.

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  1. A Symi Holiday: Day 11 « Mercian Media - 18/10/2012

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