Video Barcoding

Condensing each frame of a video into a single line and stacking them together. This is what Video Barcoding is. By taking more than one image and merging them together, it can create fascinating views into the colour schemes and lighting. I’m gone through my collection of favourite Film and TV series and started to create a Video Barcode project.

Here’s my first two attempts at Video Barcoding. The first is episode 1 of series 1 along the top, merged with the last episode of the last series of Breaking Bad (with a kick-ass watermark to boot!). The second is Terminator along the top, merged with Terminator 2 Judgment Day along the bottom.

See if you can work out the scenes. In the T2 barcode there’s a pretty obvious red line near the start for the biker bar termovision scene, a clear blue line for the Pescadero State Hospital scenes, the Cyberdyne assault and the ultimate bright orange molten steel pit;

Breaking Bad First and Last
Terminator and Terminator 2

A T-1000 Gold Star!

Gathering collectibles is something I haven’t done since I was a teenager. And, as you know (surely you know by now?!) I’m a big fan of Terminator 2
. So I’m on a mission to get some T2 props, collectibles, and the likes. You’d think the character uniform of the T-1000 from Terminator 2 is something that would be easy to get, right? I mean, it’s an LAPD long sleeve police shirt, a white t-shirt, police bottoms, police boots, belt and a badge. If you want to go all out you get the police bike, the jacket with patches, the sunglasses and the police helmet. It’s not as easy as you might think! A genuine police badge is a nightmare to source. And if you find a maker or seller, getting it with the number “572” on is near impossible. The police shirt is no longer available with pockets the correct shape, nor can you find the special buttons that go on the pockets and epaulettes. I did have an eBay seller who went off to source the bottoms, but never got back to me. The helmet was a genuine police helmet and no longer in circulation… NIGHTMARE!

So on Friday my second replica LAPD police badge turned up. It’s my second because Royal Mail lost the first. I say lost. It was allegedly delivered and signed for. Except it wasn’t. And I’ve been on the trail of finding out the exact point of using “Track and Trace” if you cannot track where it began and whom it went through, or trace the items point of delivery using GPS or any records. But that’s a rant for another day…

So as a sign of my geekness, I posted a picture of the badge on Twitter. I know some of you out there appreciate these things, though I expected no reply of sorts…

T2_Twitter

And Robert Patrick ‘favourited’ it! The actual guy himself clicked a gold star on my behalf!

RobertPatrick_twitter

And therefore as of today, I am a happy bunny! Though the thought of where my first badge went is enough to bring me back down again. Explain yourself Royal Mail!

Terminal Shooting Schedule Obsession

Yes, I know. I’ve probably whittled on about it far too much, but I can’t help it. I am intrinsically connected to the movie Terminator 2 whether I like it or not. I could probably give you T-1000 reasons why (see what I did there?), but I won’t. And my continual search for information which would lead to editing the movie into the order the scenes were actually shot in (rather than storyline edit) continues unabated*.

I want to do this purely for an exercise in Production. Which scenes were shot when?

To see what I’ve managed to put together so far, click the following link. You can scroll left and right along the timeline, and click on individual “events” to open them up for more photos and details:

My (unofficial) Terminator 2 Shooting Schedule Timeline

*UPDATE: As a movie memorabilia collector, I ended up finding an original production-used Shooting Schedule for Terminator 2. I have updated the timeline with a bit more information that I know to be accurate and correct!